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UK House Prices

As the UK economy slumps towards 2010, what are the prospects for the housing market over the coming years?

Note that various articles on the housing markets of the UK, USA and Australia are recorded at House Price Crash Discussion Forums
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little c
 20 Oct '17  04:15 : 0 recs : edited 4 times : last edit 20 Oct '17  04:44

Good morning to you all! I trust that all is well with all of you this wet Friday morning here in London! ‘It’s only taken three months and five temporary homes but we have finally bought a house,” a friend said recently. This was swiftly followed by: “I am never moving house again.”

She, her husband and their three-year-old son were left homeless after their house-buying chain broke down. She is not alone. This week a survey of 2,000 people by When You Move, a property technology company, found that “27 per cent of people who have bought a house in the past ten years have been forced to stay with friends, family or in a hotel while waiting to complete on their property, with 4.31 million people across the country left homeless by the process”.

Writing in today's 'Times', Carol Lewis argues that we need to secure the buying chain, or millions more people will be left homeless in Britain! Homelessness in Britain today is a growing problem. Buy a larger home to house your extended family and you may have solved the problem, but not everyone can afford to do this. Anna Temkin reports that buyers go wild for a place in the country.

"The slowdown in London, the region with the slowest growth this year (see statistics below), has sparked a trend for “staying put”. Many homeowners are biding their time and renovating. However, some families are making a different assessment of conditions and opting to relocate to the country now, before the gap between property values in the metropolis and those in the shires or cities, such as York, narrows further. Downsizers who want a different pace of life, but also want to free up money so that their offspring can climb on to the property ladder, are also minded to brave a move to the country. Brexit, considered the main reason behind the sluggish London market, is giving an unexpected boost to country locations ... "


Ceredigion is becoming increasingly attractive to wealthy Londoners who want a slightly slower pace of life in the country. There is plenty of organic Welsh lamb to eat as well, and the fishing is out of this world! As for Canada, there is perhaps more wilderness to explore than there is in Britain, but what is Stephen Saines doing stuck up in Toronto? Well, I suppose that that is where the jobs are! Motoko Ike'e has the same challenge in Tokyo. 36 million people is a lot, and Motoko is from the south of Japan, anyway, so why would she want to spend her days in the capital of Japan?

As for the legendary babe, prudence, well, she may be a city girl at heart, but she still enjoys country walks. Would an autumn break in Wales make sense in the current climate? There are plenty of gales in Wales at this time of year, after all! As for Lord Byron, well, he is master of all he surveys in Kent! Knole, Penshurst, Sissinghurst! An Englishman's home is his medieval castle! Lord and Lady Byron's home is more than just a castle: it is an institution! To be invited to Sunday lunch is a treat never to be missed, zorro!

Lord Byron's castles in Kent do not cut the mustard! They are large and spacious, but expensive and difficult to run! It is far better to have a penthouse in London than an estate in the country! Think of Charles4? He may have the best of both worlds, but where does he end up spending most of his time? Working in the City of London! Well, I hear you say, little c has the opportunity to take every advantage of the internet, and therefore has no need to work from an office at all. He can spend all his time working from home, if he chooses to do so. This is undoubtedly true, but it is equally true to say that the social advantages offered by the City far outweigh the occasional Hunt Ball! What little c requires the ability to attend both the annual Hunt Ball and more flexible social gatherings in the heart of the financial centres of the world, for example, London, New York and Tokyo!

As for Lord Byron's castle in Kent, it is great for defence, but if you want to go on the attack, it lacks mobility! Putin's tanks would flatten Lord Byron's castle before dawn! I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out to meet here adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat. Assuredly, we bring not innocence into the world, we bring impurity much rather. That which purifies us is trial, and trial is by what is contrary.
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little c
 20 Oct '17  04:02 : 0 recs

Good morning to you all, particularly if you live in the Far East! Here are five reasons to live in Kuala Lumpur. The Petronas Towers dominate the futuristic cityscape of this hub for Islamic finance.

1. Global business hub

Founded in 1857 by a group of Chinese miners in search of tin, Kuala Lumpur — named after the Malay for “muddy confluence” — has expanded to become Malaysia’s financial and business centre. KL is home to the country’s stock exchange, the Bursa Malaysia, and is an international hub for Islamic finance.

2. Eclectic architecture

The world’s tallest twin buildings, the Petronas Towers, dominate Kuala Lumpur’s futuristic cityscape. But there’s a colonial heart beneath the skyscrapers. The British administration designed old KL in a hotchpotch of styles, including neoclassical, neo-Gothic and mock-Tudor. Merdeka Square, where Malaysian independence was declared in 1957, was originally a cricket pitch.

3. Top nosh

Kuala Lumpur represents the best of Malaysian cuisine — whether roti canai (flatbread) from a street stall shaded by banyan leaves, or hokkien mee (noodles in soy sauce gravy) served by a traditional kopitiam (coffee shop). Fine-dining restaurants such as Mosaic at the Mandarin Oriental hotel give classical Chinese-Malay dishes such as satay, gado-gado and rendang padang a gourmet twist.

4. Green oases

Kuala Lumpur is dotted with numerous green oases teeming with tropical flora and fauna, so you don’t have to leave the city to spot a silvered leaf monkey. The KL Forest Eco Park offers nine hectares of virgin rainforest in the heart of the city, and ostriches, flamingos and peacocks parade around the KL Bird Park.

5. Sport

The legacy of Kuala Lumpur hosting the 1998 Commonwealth Games is world-class sporting facilities at the National Sports Complex at Bukit Jalil. Football is one of the city’s most popular sports: the home team, Kuala Lumpur FA, plays in the second-tier Malaysia Premier League.   
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little c
 20 Oct '17  02:33 : 0 recs : edited 2 times : last edit 20 Oct '17  02:36

Good morning to you all! As the UK economy lurches forwards, what are the prospects for the housing market over the coming years? When Samuel Johnson wrote his most famous epithet – “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life” – he wasn’t flat-hunting on a millennial’s wage. House prices in the capital are now more than 10 times the average salary. It’s no better for those just looking to rent because London’s are the fourth highest in the world.

However, property developers believe they have a scheme to help the capital retain its young professionals: micro-flats. Property developers U+I aim have announced plans to build thousands of small but self-contained apartments across central London. Kitted out with Bosch kitchen appliances, John Lewis homeware and more multifunctional furniture than an Ikea superstore. With the smallest flat at just 205 square foot in total, these “townflats”, as they will be marketed, are almost half the recommended minimum habitable size set by the Greater London Authority – but, on the flip side, they will be impossibly well-located and available to rent from as little as £700 per month. 

The ceilings really are ridiculously tall. To give me a taste of what townflat-living could be like, U+I opened up two of its prototypes in their office near Victoria station, both kitted out with Bosch kitchen appliances, John Lewis homeware and more multifunctional furniture than an Ikea superstore. They’ve even said I can come back later and spend the night. 

The first flat is a surprisingly airy duplex, with a 3.2m-high ceiling (more commonly around 2.5m), allowing for some genius space-saving furniture to be built in. Beneath the raised bed, which is accessed by a mini flight of stairs, is a utility ‘room’, complete with a washing machine and even a walk-in wardrobe. A step ladder allows you to reach kitchen cupboards that rise all the way to the ceiling, with an antiseptic, all-white bathroom safely enclosed within the kitchen unit’s MDF construction. 

The second flat I’m shown has a lower ceiling but more floor space, yet it feels smaller. However, all the fittings have a smart, piano-black sheen. It’s like the bat-cave, had Batman been a hip twenty-something working in finance. Space-saving is still the name of the game, though, with a flip-up table fitted snugly into the wardrobe, while the wall behind the bed is perforated, like a giant cribbage board, for shelving.
If the idea of living somewhere cramped just to be in the best location, location, location feels like too much of a compromise, this isn’t going to work for you. But for young professionals, with their busy social lives, it could work.

Rohan Silva, a former senior policy advisor to David Cameron and founder of members-style co-work space Second Home, backs the proposals, saying: “Young people today interpret their quality of life differently to a generation before, and they want to live in the middle of the action. They want to be close to cultural life… and they’re actually happier living in a smaller unit to do that.”

With residential space in central London now at a premium, the developer’s philosophy is that well-designed spaces can subvert historic living standards, and still be affordable. “We’re challenging design standards in order to fulfill an essential gap,” says Richard Upton, deputy chief executive at U+I. 

But what’s it like to live in a townflat? Just five minutes away from the Telegraph office, I can see on immediate upside: I can walk ‘home’ from work.  At the smart glass-fronted lobby, I am greeted by Duncan Trench, the man responsible for developing the concept. With one of his colleagues staying late to act as a makeshift porter for the night, Trench leads me through a hyper-modern lobby to my micro-home for the night. 

At 205 square foot, it is the exact size of the rather sad student studio I lived in while studying for my masters – but that’s where the similarities end. Here, there are no grubby carpets, chipped kitchen cabinets or the need to take six flights of stairs to wash my dirty clothes. And they’ve even managed to get in a double bed. Micro-living means that every piece of furniture must have more than one function. The staircase that leads to the bed doubles as a shelf and a cupboard. Even the kitchen accessories are dinky: the chopping board is also a cover guard for the sink, and the colander is collapsible, just to save space. After a quick pasta supper (to make full use of that dinky colander), I did a spot of reading, my book’s pages dutifully lit by the bounty of nightlights propped up around my pillows.

At 6ft3ins, I have been subjected to the heinous crime of having my feet poke out the end of multiple beds, but not so in this micro-flat. Despite lying on what is essentially a glorified bunk bed, I managed ten hours of replenishing sleep. So while my home-for-the-night might be small by current industry standards, at least it’s somewhere close to the action that I could reasonable afford to rent. On Monday, chief executive of the Financial Conduct Authority, Andrew Bailey spoke of a “pronounced build-up of indebtedness” among young people, who were having to resort to borrowing in order to pay for their essential living costs.

Upton sees a knock-on effect for the entire south-east. “The average salary in London is £35,037,” he says. “So young professionals are moving out to commute in, putting stresses on the train and bus systems into the centre. At U+I, we see people traveling in from Folkestone, with its new fast rail link. But anything that is an hour out of London will cost you £5,000 a year in travel. And you’re still likely never to get a seat in rush hour.”
But why have U+I taken it upon themselves to act as supposedly altruistic guardian angels for London’s young professionals? “In terms of risk for the developer or investor, the very best population is someone who can afford it,” explains Upton.

They’re not the only ones tapping into this market. As soon as U+I unveiled its concept, they had more than 140 inquiries, despite being only at a prototype stage. Sadiq Khan, the London mayor, has committed £25m to enable Pocket, another micro-flat developer, to build around 1,000. When 14 space-saving flats went on the rental market in New York last year, they attracted 60,000 applicants. Of course, the lack of affordable housing is a problem that goes far wider than the big cities. This week, a micro-home inspired by first-class airline travel pods, called an iKozie, welcomed its first tenant in Worcester. It seems millennials aren’t too bothered about how much of the pie they get – as long as they can afford a slice.

The Daily Telegraph - Can micro-flats solve Britain's housing crisis?

Micro-flats are going to help those who don't need much space. For those who live in large, extended families, bigger homes need to be built! Have you got enough room in your present accommodation, Lord Byron, or do you find it difficult to accommodate all your guests at once, for example?
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little c
 19 Oct '17  17:08 : 0 recs

To be naughty is not an option, Red Hot Pawn! It is an obligation, legendary babe, prudence!

What's the naughtiest thing you ever did?
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little c
 19 Oct '17  04:28 : 0 recs : edited 1 time : last edit 19 Oct '17  04:36

Good morning to you all! I trust that all is well with all of you this Thursday morning in the middle of October! As the UK economy lurches forward, what are the prospects for the housing market over the coming years? Well, we all need somewhere to live, so what is stopping us living at the Ned? Money springs to mind, as a room costs a couple of hundred pounds a night! Yet if you are looking for a job in the City of London, what could be a better base from which to mount your campaign?

To tackle the homeless crisis, however, requires more thought than five star hotels and luxury accommodation in the West End of London. What is required is social housing which people can afford to live in. Of course, we cannot all open our homes to London's poor, so what else can we do? Well, there are hostels for the homeless, for example, at Centrepoint, and council housing still exists in places, although lots of people want cheap accommodation in the heart of London, one of the most expensive cities in the world in which to live.

What you could do is to move out of the capital and find somewhere slightly cheaper in which to buy a home, for example, the home counties or outer suburbs of London: Barking, Barnet, Croydon etc. Alternatively, you could seek more remunerative employment in London, although you are competing with a highly skilled global workforce for the same luxury accommodation. What do you think, Thoughtful?
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little c
 19 Oct '17  04:28 : 0 recs

How about The Ned in the heart of the City of London, Slightly Optimistic? When Nick Jones, the founder of Soho House & Co, first saw the City's disused Midland Bank building in 2012, he fell in love. 'The property had been empty for nearly eight years but there was something about it – the details and scale of it – that just floored me,' Jones explains. The moment he left, he called Ron Burkle, Soho House chairman and investor. 'Ron came to view the building and straight away we began to imagine how the project would take form,' says Jones. Burkle knew a project of this size would require the collaboration of many skills, and so introduced Jones to Andrew Zobler, the CEO of New York's Sydell Group. 'The Ned was a much bigger project than either of us had undertaken before,' says Zobler, 'so it made sense for us to partner on it.'

Soho House & Co has built and run 18 members' clubs – most with bedrooms – and 37 restaurants around the world, while Sydell Group has eight hotels in North America, including The NoMad in Manhattan, Freehand in Miami and The Line in Los Angeles. While both companies have worked with historic buildings before, Jones and Zobler were immediately inspired by Sir Edwin 'Ned' Lutyens' masterpiece at 27 Poultry – all 29,450 square metres of it. 'It was the most beautiful building I'd ever seen,' says Jones. Zobler adds: 'The architecture is outstanding and so well preserved. You can't help but fall in love with it.'

Jones believes The Ned's location – an evolving business district with little in the way of hotels – bears a resemblance to The NoMad's once neglected, now vibrant Madison Square North district in New York. 'With The NoMad, Sydell took an area of Manhattan that had been overlooked in terms of hospitality, opened a hotel with a very clever New York-Parisian feel, and turned the neighbourhood into a destination. I hope we'll achieve something similar with The Ned,' says Jones. 'The City is as busy as Soho and much better looking; it's the capital's engine room for commerce but also has more than its fair share of culture for one square mile. And – like New York's own Financial District – it's developing at a rapid pace.'

The companies brought different skills to the table. 'I have a lot of respect for the design and style of Soho House,' says Zobler. 'The Ned's grand banking hall is vast, and because the company operates different types of restaurants and retail spaces – Cecconi's, Pizza East, Cowshed and so on – Nick and the team were great at working out what should go where.' As for Sydell's role, Zobler says: 'We've acted as an editor, challenging and consolidating Nick's vision. I kept reminding him that we were in the City of London – a lot of Soho House properties and clubs take their cues from the English countryside, so I pushed him to make it more urbane and gentlemanly, to pick up on the building's banking heritage.

Jones agrees: 'Zobler challenges me on all my creative decisions – he's creative himself, very good on operations and brilliant at development.' There may well be more Ned's ahead – the duo is now on the lookout for large heritage buildings to develop in Los Angeles and New York. So, what do Jones and Zobler like most about The Ned? For both, the clincher has to be the roof. 'Sitting by the pool on the rooftop of a 100-year-old building, looking out over St Paul's Cathedral and beyond – it doesn't get any better than that,' says Zobler.
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little c
 19 Oct '17  02:56 : 0 recs

Since opening this year, the Ned hotel has become the place to be seen in London. Its scale and grandeur reflect the £200 million spent on its development by the Soho House group.

Situated in the heart of the Square Mile, it was formerly the headquarters of Midland Bank — a 1920s masterpiece by Edwin “Ned” Lutyens, the leading British architect of the 20th century (whose name inspired that of the new hotel).

The home has nine bedrooms. Reginald McKenna, the chairman of the bank who commissioned Lutyens, turned to him again in 1935 when he wanted to build a house for his son and daughter-in-law as a wedding present.

The drawings that Lutyens provided for the elevations influenced the design of Fairwood House, a vast property in Hampstead Garden…

The Times - Lutyens' vision brought to life
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little c
 18 Oct '17  16:33 : 0 recs

Buy what you need! Sell what you only want!
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little c
 18 Oct '17  15:47 : 0 recs

So where to buy and what to buy? I would suggest an office in the City of London, a farm in the country and a hotel by the sea! Is this your portfolio, too, Lord Byron?
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little c
 18 Oct '17  06:32 : 0 recs : edited 3 times : last edit 18 Oct '17  06:47

Good morning to you all! I trust that all is well with you this stormy October Thursday! I blame global warming and hurricane Ophelia for today's gale, but 2 bedroomed flats are for sale in Ten Trinity Square, London EC3, for around one million pounds sterling. This is, for central London, remarkably good value for money, and includes a world class restaurant, swimming pool, spa and gym. Here is the lunchtime menu online:

LUNCH MENU/
£29 Two Course
£39 Three Course
 
STARTERS

Organic Farmed Egg
Fregola, brocolli, parmesan, lemon balm and sage infused milk
Blue Fin Tuna

Marinated with Tasmanian pepper, cold infused bouillon of raspberry, fig and hibiscus

Les Landes Foie Gras
Creme brulée, Granny Smith apple, raisins and toasted hazelnuts


MAINS

Welsh Organic Lamb
Roasted saddle, chamomile, Goats yoghurt and smoked potato filled pasta

Acquarello Risotto
Roasted bell pepper, jasmine tea and tarragon

Line Caught Cod
Confit, heirloom carrots, kale. mimolette and saffron sabayon


DESSERT

Chocolate Cherry

Coffee, chocolate and black cardamom mousse, amarena and griotte sorbet

White Peach

Lemon balm and liquorice crémeux, consommé and confit white peach infused with tumeric

The White Millefeuille

Tahitian vanilla cream, Jasmine jelly, Voatsiperifery pepper foam


I commend the Queen of Spades' lunchtime menu to you all on Monday 23 October 2017! Dinner could be even better, as the dishes are all a la carte, Porn'., although it depends how much choice you really want, Elizabeth. Do you like French food in the first place, zorro, or do you prefer to cook something else? Does Gorgeous George Sore Ass sit down to this kind of meal at the weekend, or is he more likely to try something more Portuguese in character?

Does Motoko Ike'e go shopping in Tokyo market for this kind of food, or does she prefer sushi? Does Stephen Saines prefer the domestic produce of Canada to French fare, and is this what he generally cooks for his family around the American Thanksgiving holiday at the end of Fall! And what about little c? Little c is well known to like a good hot curry, but is he able to stomach foreign food, particularly from the Queen of Spades' very own kitchen here in London?
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little c
 18 Oct '17  04:22 : 0 recs

Good morning to you everyone reading 'Serious Topics', 'The Third' and other social media today! I trust that all is well with all of you today! As the UK economy lurches towards 2020, Porn', what are the prospects for the housing market over the coming decades? Are we just at the start of a technological revolution that is changing the ways in which we all live and work and play, or are we in long-term economic decline in the twenty-first century!

Or are the doomsayers ultimately right? This is the end of our civilisation! Well, I see plenty of reasons to be optimistic, but in scientific terms, we are heading for an increase in entropy, or chaos, and therefore the slow disintegration of the Universe. There is nothing we can do about the end of the Universe, but we might as well enjoy our lives whilst we can still live them!

House prices across the UK have jumped by an average of 4% in the year to September, according to Britain's largest lender, the Halifax. The rate indicates a pick-up from August, when the Halifax said prices were rising at an annual pace of 2.6%. The Halifax said the average price of a house or flat in the UK had now risen to a new high of £225,109. A shortage of properties for sale and growth in full-time employment was supporting prices, it said. "However, increasing pressure on spending power and continuing affordability concerns may well dampen buyer demand," said Russell Galley, the managing director of Halifax Community Bank.

Rival lender Nationwide has said prices in the year to September rose by 2%. London house prices fall for first time in eight years The Halifax figures are not broken down by region, but other research has indicated that while house price growth is slowing in the south of England, it is rising in parts of the Midlands and the North. Between August and September, prices rose by 0.8%, the Halifax said, compared to a monthly rise of 1.5% in the previous month. The 4% annual rise in house prices is calculated by comparing the three months to September with the same three months last year.

So average UK house prices are rising by about +4% a year, Porn', and there is no sign of a market correction! The best bet, in such circumstances, is to buy where you want to live! My tenants are currently looking for a home to buy, but they realise that house prices are expensive in London! The only advice I can offer them is to take full advantage of the relatively low interest rates currently on offer! Buying to let offers one way of financing property investment, and so long as prices do not fall significantly, it seems like a sensible way of buying property in the United Kingdom! What sort of home are you after, and how are you going to pay for it? 'The Guardian' leads this morning with some editorial comment on social care: the cost of cowardice.

"The cost of social care is bankrupting local councils and threatening the NHS. The latest study points out that any reform based, like the so-called dementia tax, on property values must take account of how different they are in the south of England compared with the north or with Wales. Last week, the normally ultra-cool NHS boss Simon Stevens told MPs on the health committee that its budget was “extremely challenging” and unless it was increased, the NHS might not be able to meet patient demand. With both health and social care budgets under such extreme pressure, it is no surprise that the two arms of care, instead of being locked in a protective embrace of those who should be able to rely on them, are engaged in the most bad-tempered wrestling that informed observers can remember.

Surveying the wreckage of seven years of austerity, the chancellor, Philip Hammond, is under instructions to find a headline-grabbing initiative in next month’s budget to redress the generation gap. The dementia tax may have been flawed, but some kind of windfall tax on the huge increase in house values enjoyed by many older voters is one answer, and seems still to be in the mix. At the Tory party conference, it has now emerged that the social care minister, Jackie Doyle-Price, repeated the argument that it was unfair if old people who lived in valuable houses had social care bills paid by the state.

There is no question that social care desperately needs more cash. In its budget submission, councillors argued that by 2020 councils in England will have lost £16bn of core funding. There will be a shortfall of nearly £6bn by the end of the decade, and despite the extra cash for social care that was released earlier this year partly to meet the cost of paying the higher living wage and partly to keep residential care homes afloat, £1bn of that will be in social care. Councillors say there is not a penny of slack in care home budgets, where fees are so squeezed that without cross subsidy from private residents – sometimes of as much as 50% – some care homes would cease to be viable. Nor is there an argument about the role that councils have to play in making sure care packages are available so that people can be discharged from hospital. But, as winter approaches, the pressure that government is putting on both the NHS and councils to enable patients to be discharged is driving to breaking point the tense relationship between the two different providers. While healthcare is free and social care is means-tested, it won’t heal.

This is not an insoluble problem. It is not all about money, although money is needed right now to keep the service afloat. As the economist Kate Barker said when she published her report for the thinktank the King’s Fund three years ago, there is a sustainable and affordable answer. But it would mean some structural reform and the gradual extension of free care, starting with critical care and extending to those with substantial needs as money became available. It would mean a bigger bill for the taxpayer, but a much more coherent experience for patients and their carers. It would end the disputes between NHS and local government over who pays for what, and it would reward cooperation. In Manchester, where integrated health and social care is already being pioneered across the region, the mayor Andy Burnham – a former Labour health secretary – is already pressing Mr Hammond to allow him to raise a levy that would enable him to introduce free social care and joint budgets. Mr Hammond should listen.

The crisis in social care has been predictable, and predicted, for a generation. The failure of successive governments to think clearly and build consensus around a solution is a bleak indictment of short-termist democracy. Like a patient too scared to see the doctor, their cowardly approach has allowed a complex but soluble problem to snowball into a threat to the welfare of thousands of Britons – and even to the sustainability of the NHS."


'The Guardian' takes the defensive stance that for more than a generation, politicians have ducked the challenge of restructuring health and social care. But if they don’t act now it may be too late As for housing, well, of course older people need somewhere to live. If they still cope at home, so much the better! But if they need nursing care, a nursing home should still be considered. Carers can help, but how should we be paying for them in the twenty-first century?
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little c
 18 Oct '17  02:10 : 0 recs

So how would Kant and Nietzsche have approached the housing crisis today? Kant would have cited the categorical imperative. What we do, including providing housing for the homeless, should not just be right for us. It should be right for everyone. Nietzsche would have conceded that life is a struggle, but that we should at least try to be generous to poorer members of our society!
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little c
 17 Oct '17  07:56 : 0 recs

Immanuel Kant (22 April 1724 – 12 February 1804) was a German philosopher who is a central figure in modern philosophy, a little like the most popular philosopher of more modern times, little c. Kant argued that the human mind creates the structure of human experience, that reason is the source of morality, that aesthetics arises from a faculty of disinterested judgment, that space and time are forms of our sensibility, and that the world as it is "in-itself" is independent of our concepts of it. Kant took himself to have effected a "Copernican revolution" in philosophy, akin to Copernicus' reversal of the age-old belief that the sun revolved around the earth. His beliefs continue to have a major influence on contemporary philosophy, especially the fields of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political theory, and aesthetics.

Politically, Kant was one of the earliest exponents of the idea that perpetual peace could be secured through universal democracy and international cooperation. He believed that this will be the eventual outcome of universal history, although it is not rationally planned. The exact nature of Kant's religious ideas continues to be the subject of especially heated philosophical dispute, as viewpoints are ranging from the idea that Kant was an early and radical exponent of atheism who finally exploded the ontological argument for God's existence, to more critical treatments epitomized by Nietzsche who claimed that Kant had "theologian blood" and that Kant was merely a sophisticated apologist for traditional Christian religious belief, writing that "Kant wanted to prove, in a way that would dumbfound the common man, that the common man was right: that was the secret joke of this soul."

In one of Kant's major works, the Critique of Pure Reason (Kritik der reinen Vernunft, 1781), he attempted to explain the relationship between reason and human experience and to move beyond the failures of traditional philosophy and metaphysics. Kant wanted to put an end to an era of futile and speculative theories of human experience, while resisting the scepticism of thinkers such as David Hume. Kant regarded himself as ending and showing the way beyond the impasse which modern philosophy had led to between rationalists and empiricists, and is widely held to have synthesized these two early modern traditions in his thought.

Kant argued that our experiences are structured by necessary features of our minds. In his view, the mind shapes and structures experience so that, on an abstract level, all human experience shares certain essential structural features. Among other things, Kant believed that the concepts of space and time are integral to all human experience, as are our concepts of cause and effect. One important consequence of this view is that our experience of things is always of the phenomenal world as conveyed by our senses: we do not have direct access to things in themselves, the so-called noumenal world. Kant published other important works on ethics, religion, law, aesthetics, astronomy, and history. These included the Critique of Practical Reason (Kritik der praktischen Vernunft, 1788), the Metaphysics of Morals (Die Metaphysik der Sitten, 1797), which dealt with ethics, and the Critique of Judgment (Kritik der Urteilskraft, 1790), which looks at aesthetics and teleology.
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little c
 17 Oct '17  07:53 : 0 recs

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (15 October 1844 – 25 August 1900) was a German philosopher, cultural critic, poet, philologist, and Latin and Greek scholar whose work has exerted a profound influence on Western philosophy and modern intellectual history, Slightly Optimistic. Many of your apparently random musings here in 'Serious Topics' originate in something a little more philosophical. Nietzsche began his career as a classical philologist before turning to philosophy. He became the youngest ever to hold the Chair of Classical Philology at the University of Basel in 1869, at the age of 24. He resigned in 1879 due to health problems that plagued him most of his life, and he completed much of his core writing in the following decade. In 1889, at age 44, he suffered a collapse and a complete loss of his mental faculties. He lived his remaining years in the care of his mother until her death in 1897, and then with his sister Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche, and died in 1900.

Nietzsche's body of work touched widely on art, philology, history, religion, tragedy, culture, and science, and drew early inspiration from figures such as Schopenhauer, Wagner, and Goethe. His writing spans philosophical polemics, poetry, cultural criticism, and fiction while displaying a fondness for aphorism and irony. Some prominent elements of his philosophy include his radical critique of truth in favor of perspectivism; his genealogical critique of religion and Christian morality, and his related theory of master–slave morality; his aesthetic affirmation of existence in response to the "death of God" and the profound crisis of nihilism; his notion of the Apollonian and Dionysian; and his characterization of the human subject as the expression of competing wills, collectively understood as the will to power. In his later work, he developed influential concepts such as the Übermensch and the doctrine of eternal return, and became increasingly preoccupied with the creative powers of the individual to overcome social, cultural, and moral contexts in pursuit of new values and aesthetic health.

After his death, Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche became the curator and editor of her brother's manuscripts, reworking Nietzsche's unpublished writings to fit her own German nationalist ideology while often contradicting or obfuscating his stated opinions, which were explicitly opposed to antisemitism and nationalism. Through her published editions, Nietzsche's work became associated with fascism and Nazism; 20th century scholars contested this interpretation of his work and corrected editions of his writings were soon made available. His thought enjoyed renewed popularity in the 1960s, and his ideas have since had a profound impact on 20th and early-21st century thinkers across philosophy—especially in schools of continental philosophy such as existentialism, postmodernism, and post-structuralism—as well as art, literature, psychology, politics and popular culture.
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little c
 17 Oct '17  06:46 : 0 recs : edited 1 time : last edit 17 Oct '17  06:52

Do you live in an affordable home, Slightly Optimistic, and if so, have you read any of the great philosophers? Do they tell you why you live in an affordable home, and what you can do about it?
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little c
 17 Oct '17  06:08 : 0 recs

There is only one way more affordable homes will get built in this country and that is if local authorities like my own borough are given the resources to build them.

As we move into the Brexit era, Britain must be far more visionary and build homes that become national assets. Private developers build the bare minimum of affordable homes; their real focus is on profits from luxury developments. Only when public institutions take the lead in housing models will we see the kind of homes being built that begin to address our housing crisis.

In my local area, even within the existing restrictive system, we have demonstrated that it is possible to build affordable homes, particularly on disused railway land. in 2012, I negotiated the development of land owned by Network Rail at Royal Mint Street. There are significant pockets of disused railway land across the whole of London and I can see the potential for other railway villages.

But councils can’t tackle this crisis alone. I would like to see a national railway land housing corporation to build council homes, develop homes through community land trusts, build more private rented sector dwellings and more homes for sale, following our success with railway lands in the East End of London.

Last month, a report from the Greater London Authority showed that Tower Hamlets topped the league for affordable housebuilding, with Greenwich in second place.
My borough gained 1,830 affordable homes between 2013 and 2016, including deductions for any affordable housing lost. I led on the housing portfolio in Tower Hamlets when these homes were commissioned. For us, it’s all about involving the local community and thinking in new ways.

As well as building on old railway land, we also established an infill scheme to identify existing estates with room for additional blocks. In my former role I kickstarted Tower Hamlets council homes programme through The Estates Capacity Project, which began in March 2012 with the objective of building more new council homes, identifying sites in Bethnal Green, Globe Town and Mile End and which launched the largest regeneration project in London at Blackwall, together with the rebuilding of Stepney’s long-neglected.

We also commissioned the first new homes in decades to be built directly by the council, rather than housing associations, at the reopened Poplar Baths and the site of a disused council depot at Watts Grove.

We worked in partnership with the GLA to secure an additional £7m for Watts Grove in 2013, which delivered 149 homes and was recently opened in Tower Hamlets by Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London.

However, the challenge was the coalition’s government introduction of the market affordable rent, and the ineffective Labour opposition at the time affected rent levels even though the borough had managed to bring the rent down to a lower level.

It was always my intention to bring rents down further and so in 2014 I worked with Tower Hamlets Citizens UK on a seminar on the Living Rent; the legacy I began has continued to deliver lower rented homes.

Our Whitechapel Vision masterplan capitalises on the new Crossrail hub to bring investment to our town centre while ensuring it does not become commercialised at the expense of local heritage and local people. Significant change is expected in Whitechapel in the next 10-15 years as large developments come forward, delivering up to 3,500 new homes and 5,000 new jobs.

As a country, we need to be far more visionary as we prepare for leaving the EU. In the past, EU institutions and funds, such as the European structural and investment funds and the European Investment Bank, have provided a significant amount of funding for UK infrastructure projects.

The decision to withdraw from the EU has created uncertainty in this area, despite the government’s pledge to provide new opportunities for the private sector to play a role in delivering UK infrastructure projects.

By 2020, local government will have lost 75p out of every £1 of core central funding that it had to spend in 2015. In terms of helping the homeless and providing temporary accommodation, the funding gap by 2019-20 is estimated to be £200m. As No 10 aides admit cash helps create just 5,000 extra homes a year, it is no surprise the funds are being tagged ‘chicken feed’.

At the Conservative party conference, Theresa May pledged an extra £2bn for social housing. This comes on top of the February housing white paper, which promised reforms to boost the housing market and increase the supply of new homes, and the £2.3bn fund launched in July 2017 by the communities secretary, Sajid Javid, through the housing infrastructure fund, with the aim of opening bids for local authorities to come forward with proposals to aid faster building of homes.

But it is still not enough. The Chartered Institute of Housing’s annual review revealed that the government is spending four times less on building affordable homes for those on a low income than it is on subsidising private housing.

Building homes on Network Rail land, supporting urban community land trusts and beginning the foundations for a living rent has taught me that Britain must be far more pioneering. This crisis can only become more difficult to conquer the longer this task is left.
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
little c
 17 Oct '17  06:08 : 0 recs

There is only one way more affordable homes will get built in this country and that is if local authorities like my own borough are given the resources to build them.

As we move into the Brexit era, Britain must be far more visionary and build homes that become national assets. Private developers build the bare minimum of affordable homes; their real focus is on profits from luxury developments. Only when public institutions take the lead in housing models will we see the kind of homes being built that begin to address our housing crisis.

In my local area, even within the existing restrictive system, we have demonstrated that it is possible to build affordable homes, particularly on disused railway land. in 2012, I negotiated the development of land owned by Network Rail at Royal Mint Street. There are significant pockets of disused railway land across the whole of London and I can see the potential for other railway villages.

But councils can’t tackle this crisis alone. I would like to see a national railway land housing corporation to build council homes, develop homes through community land trusts, build more private rented sector dwellings and more homes for sale, following our success with railway lands in the East End of London.

Last month, a report from the Greater London Authority showed that Tower Hamlets topped the league for affordable housebuilding, with Greenwich in second place.
My borough gained 1,830 affordable homes between 2013 and 2016, including deductions for any affordable housing lost. I led on the housing portfolio in Tower Hamlets when these homes were commissioned. For us, it’s all about involving the local community and thinking in new ways.

As well as building on old railway land, we also established an infill scheme to identify existing estates with room for additional blocks. In my former role I kickstarted Tower Hamlets council homes programme through The Estates Capacity Project, which began in March 2012 with the objective of building more new council homes, identifying sites in Bethnal Green, Globe Town and Mile End and which launched the largest regeneration project in London at Blackwall, together with the rebuilding of Stepney’s long-neglected.

We also commissioned the first new homes in decades to be built directly by the council, rather than housing associations, at the reopened Poplar Baths and the site of a disused council depot at Watts Grove.

We worked in partnership with the GLA to secure an additional £7m for Watts Grove in 2013, which delivered 149 homes and was recently opened in Tower Hamlets by Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London.

However, the challenge was the coalition’s government introduction of the market affordable rent, and the ineffective Labour opposition at the time affected rent levels even though the borough had managed to bring the rent down to a lower level.

It was always my intention to bring rents down further and so in 2014 I worked with Tower Hamlets Citizens UK on a seminar on the Living Rent; the legacy I began has continued to deliver lower rented homes.

Our Whitechapel Vision masterplan capitalises on the new Crossrail hub to bring investment to our town centre while ensuring it does not become commercialised at the expense of local heritage and local people. Significant change is expected in Whitechapel in the next 10-15 years as large developments come forward, delivering up to 3,500 new homes and 5,000 new jobs.

As a country, we need to be far more visionary as we prepare for leaving the EU. In the past, EU institutions and funds, such as the European structural and investment funds and the European Investment Bank, have provided a significant amount of funding for UK infrastructure projects.

The decision to withdraw from the EU has created uncertainty in this area, despite the government’s pledge to provide new opportunities for the private sector to play a role in delivering UK infrastructure projects.

By 2020, local government will have lost 75p out of every £1 of core central funding that it had to spend in 2015. In terms of helping the homeless and providing temporary accommodation, the funding gap by 2019-20 is estimated to be £200m. As No 10 aides admit cash helps create just 5,000 extra homes a year, it is no surprise the funds are being tagged ‘chicken feed’.

At the Conservative party conference, Theresa May pledged an extra £2bn for social housing. This comes on top of the February housing white paper, which promised reforms to boost the housing market and increase the supply of new homes, and the £2.3bn fund launched in July 2017 by the communities secretary, Sajid Javid, through the housing infrastructure fund, with the aim of opening bids for local authorities to come forward with proposals to aid faster building of homes.

But it is still not enough. The Chartered Institute of Housing’s annual review revealed that the government is spending four times less on building affordable homes for those on a low income than it is on subsidising private housing.

Building homes on Network Rail land, supporting urban community land trusts and beginning the foundations for a living rent has taught me that Britain must be far more pioneering. This crisis can only become more difficult to conquer the longer this task is left.
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
little c
 17 Oct '17  06:08 : 0 recs

There is only one way more affordable homes will get built in this country and that is if local authorities like my own borough are given the resources to build them.

As we move into the Brexit era, Britain must be far more visionary and build homes that become national assets. Private developers build the bare minimum of affordable homes; their real focus is on profits from luxury developments. Only when public institutions take the lead in housing models will we see the kind of homes being built that begin to address our housing crisis.

In my local area, even within the existing restrictive system, we have demonstrated that it is possible to build affordable homes, particularly on disused railway land. in 2012, I negotiated the development of land owned by Network Rail at Royal Mint Street. There are significant pockets of disused railway land across the whole of London and I can see the potential for other railway villages.

But councils can’t tackle this crisis alone. I would like to see a national railway land housing corporation to build council homes, develop homes through community land trusts, build more private rented sector dwellings and more homes for sale, following our success with railway lands in the East End of London.

Last month, a report from the Greater London Authority showed that Tower Hamlets topped the league for affordable housebuilding, with Greenwich in second place.
My borough gained 1,830 affordable homes between 2013 and 2016, including deductions for any affordable housing lost. I led on the housing portfolio in Tower Hamlets when these homes were commissioned. For us, it’s all about involving the local community and thinking in new ways.

As well as building on old railway land, we also established an infill scheme to identify existing estates with room for additional blocks. In my former role I kickstarted Tower Hamlets council homes programme through The Estates Capacity Project, which began in March 2012 with the objective of building more new council homes, identifying sites in Bethnal Green, Globe Town and Mile End and which launched the largest regeneration project in London at Blackwall, together with the rebuilding of Stepney’s long-neglected.

We also commissioned the first new homes in decades to be built directly by the council, rather than housing associations, at the reopened Poplar Baths and the site of a disused council depot at Watts Grove.

We worked in partnership with the GLA to secure an additional £7m for Watts Grove in 2013, which delivered 149 homes and was recently opened in Tower Hamlets by Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London.

However, the challenge was the coalition’s government introduction of the market affordable rent, and the ineffective Labour opposition at the time affected rent levels even though the borough had managed to bring the rent down to a lower level.

It was always my intention to bring rents down further and so in 2014 I worked with Tower Hamlets Citizens UK on a seminar on the Living Rent; the legacy I began has continued to deliver lower rented homes.

Our Whitechapel Vision masterplan capitalises on the new Crossrail hub to bring investment to our town centre while ensuring it does not become commercialised at the expense of local heritage and local people. Significant change is expected in Whitechapel in the next 10-15 years as large developments come forward, delivering up to 3,500 new homes and 5,000 new jobs.

As a country, we need to be far more visionary as we prepare for leaving the EU. In the past, EU institutions and funds, such as the European structural and investment funds and the European Investment Bank, have provided a significant amount of funding for UK infrastructure projects.

The decision to withdraw from the EU has created uncertainty in this area, despite the government’s pledge to provide new opportunities for the private sector to play a role in delivering UK infrastructure projects.

By 2020, local government will have lost 75p out of every £1 of core central funding that it had to spend in 2015. In terms of helping the homeless and providing temporary accommodation, the funding gap by 2019-20 is estimated to be £200m. As No 10 aides admit cash helps create just 5,000 extra homes a year, it is no surprise the funds are being tagged ‘chicken feed’.

At the Conservative party conference, Theresa May pledged an extra £2bn for social housing. This comes on top of the February housing white paper, which promised reforms to boost the housing market and increase the supply of new homes, and the £2.3bn fund launched in July 2017 by the communities secretary, Sajid Javid, through the housing infrastructure fund, with the aim of opening bids for local authorities to come forward with proposals to aid faster building of homes.

But it is still not enough. The Chartered Institute of Housing’s annual review revealed that the government is spending four times less on building affordable homes for those on a low income than it is on subsidising private housing.

Building homes on Network Rail land, supporting urban community land trusts and beginning the foundations for a living rent has taught me that Britain must be far more pioneering. This crisis can only become more difficult to conquer the longer this task is left.
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
little c
 17 Oct '17  06:08 : 0 recs

There is only one way more affordable homes will get built in this country and that is if local authorities like my own borough are given the resources to build them.

As we move into the Brexit era, Britain must be far more visionary and build homes that become national assets. Private developers build the bare minimum of affordable homes; their real focus is on profits from luxury developments. Only when public institutions take the lead in housing models will we see the kind of homes being built that begin to address our housing crisis.

In my local area, even within the existing restrictive system, we have demonstrated that it is possible to build affordable homes, particularly on disused railway land. in 2012, I negotiated the development of land owned by Network Rail at Royal Mint Street. There are significant pockets of disused railway land across the whole of London and I can see the potential for other railway villages.

But councils can’t tackle this crisis alone. I would like to see a national railway land housing corporation to build council homes, develop homes through community land trusts, build more private rented sector dwellings and more homes for sale, following our success with railway lands in the East End of London.

Last month, a report from the Greater London Authority showed that Tower Hamlets topped the league for affordable housebuilding, with Greenwich in second place.
My borough gained 1,830 affordable homes between 2013 and 2016, including deductions for any affordable housing lost. I led on the housing portfolio in Tower Hamlets when these homes were commissioned. For us, it’s all about involving the local community and thinking in new ways.

As well as building on old railway land, we also established an infill scheme to identify existing estates with room for additional blocks. In my former role I kickstarted Tower Hamlets council homes programme through The Estates Capacity Project, which began in March 2012 with the objective of building more new council homes, identifying sites in Bethnal Green, Globe Town and Mile End and which launched the largest regeneration project in London at Blackwall, together with the rebuilding of Stepney’s long-neglected.

We also commissioned the first new homes in decades to be built directly by the council, rather than housing associations, at the reopened Poplar Baths and the site of a disused council depot at Watts Grove.

We worked in partnership with the GLA to secure an additional £7m for Watts Grove in 2013, which delivered 149 homes and was recently opened in Tower Hamlets by Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London.

However, the challenge was the coalition’s government introduction of the market affordable rent, and the ineffective Labour opposition at the time affected rent levels even though the borough had managed to bring the rent down to a lower level.

It was always my intention to bring rents down further and so in 2014 I worked with Tower Hamlets Citizens UK on a seminar on the Living Rent; the legacy I began has continued to deliver lower rented homes.

Our Whitechapel Vision masterplan capitalises on the new Crossrail hub to bring investment to our town centre while ensuring it does not become commercialised at the expense of local heritage and local people. Significant change is expected in Whitechapel in the next 10-15 years as large developments come forward, delivering up to 3,500 new homes and 5,000 new jobs.

As a country, we need to be far more visionary as we prepare for leaving the EU. In the past, EU institutions and funds, such as the European structural and investment funds and the European Investment Bank, have provided a significant amount of funding for UK infrastructure projects.

The decision to withdraw from the EU has created uncertainty in this area, despite the government’s pledge to provide new opportunities for the private sector to play a role in delivering UK infrastructure projects.

By 2020, local government will have lost 75p out of every £1 of core central funding that it had to spend in 2015. In terms of helping the homeless and providing temporary accommodation, the funding gap by 2019-20 is estimated to be £200m. As No 10 aides admit cash helps create just 5,000 extra homes a year, it is no surprise the funds are being tagged ‘chicken feed’.

At the Conservative party conference, Theresa May pledged an extra £2bn for social housing. This comes on top of the February housing white paper, which promised reforms to boost the housing market and increase the supply of new homes, and the £2.3bn fund launched in July 2017 by the communities secretary, Sajid Javid, through the housing infrastructure fund, with the aim of opening bids for local authorities to come forward with proposals to aid faster building of homes.

But it is still not enough. The Chartered Institute of Housing’s annual review revealed that the government is spending four times less on building affordable homes for those on a low income than it is on subsidising private housing.

Building homes on Network Rail land, supporting urban community land trusts and beginning the foundations for a living rent has taught me that Britain must be far more pioneering. This crisis can only become more difficult to conquer the longer this task is left.
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
little c
 17 Oct '17  06:08 : 0 recs

There is only one way more affordable homes will get built in this country and that is if local authorities like my own borough are given the resources to build them.

As we move into the Brexit era, Britain must be far more visionary and build homes that become national assets. Private developers build the bare minimum of affordable homes; their real focus is on profits from luxury developments. Only when public institutions take the lead in housing models will we see the kind of homes being built that begin to address our housing crisis.

In my local area, even within the existing restrictive system, we have demonstrated that it is possible to build affordable homes, particularly on disused railway land. in 2012, I negotiated the development of land owned by Network Rail at Royal Mint Street. There are significant pockets of disused railway land across the whole of London and I can see the potential for other railway villages.

But councils can’t tackle this crisis alone. I would like to see a national railway land housing corporation to build council homes, develop homes through community land trusts, build more private rented sector dwellings and more homes for sale, following our success with railway lands in the East End of London.

Last month, a report from the Greater London Authority showed that Tower Hamlets topped the league for affordable housebuilding, with Greenwich in second place.
My borough gained 1,830 affordable homes between 2013 and 2016, including deductions for any affordable housing lost. I led on the housing portfolio in Tower Hamlets when these homes were commissioned. For us, it’s all about involving the local community and thinking in new ways.

As well as building on old railway land, we also established an infill scheme to identify existing estates with room for additional blocks. In my former role I kickstarted Tower Hamlets council homes programme through The Estates Capacity Project, which began in March 2012 with the objective of building more new council homes, identifying sites in Bethnal Green, Globe Town and Mile End and which launched the largest regeneration project in London at Blackwall, together with the rebuilding of Stepney’s long-neglected.

We also commissioned the first new homes in decades to be built directly by the council, rather than housing associations, at the reopened Poplar Baths and the site of a disused council depot at Watts Grove.

We worked in partnership with the GLA to secure an additional £7m for Watts Grove in 2013, which delivered 149 homes and was recently opened in Tower Hamlets by Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London.

However, the challenge was the coalition’s government introduction of the market affordable rent, and the ineffective Labour opposition at the time affected rent levels even though the borough had managed to bring the rent down to a lower level.

It was always my intention to bring rents down further and so in 2014 I worked with Tower Hamlets Citizens UK on a seminar on the Living Rent; the legacy I began has continued to deliver lower rented homes.

Our Whitechapel Vision masterplan capitalises on the new Crossrail hub to bring investment to our town centre while ensuring it does not become commercialised at the expense of local heritage and local people. Significant change is expected in Whitechapel in the next 10-15 years as large developments come forward, delivering up to 3,500 new homes and 5,000 new jobs.

As a country, we need to be far more visionary as we prepare for leaving the EU. In the past, EU institutions and funds, such as the European structural and investment funds and the European Investment Bank, have provided a significant amount of funding for UK infrastructure projects.

The decision to withdraw from the EU has created uncertainty in this area, despite the government’s pledge to provide new opportunities for the private sector to play a role in delivering UK infrastructure projects.

By 2020, local government will have lost 75p out of every £1 of core central funding that it had to spend in 2015. In terms of helping the homeless and providing temporary accommodation, the funding gap by 2019-20 is estimated to be £200m. As No 10 aides admit cash helps create just 5,000 extra homes a year, it is no surprise the funds are being tagged ‘chicken feed’.

At the Conservative party conference, Theresa May pledged an extra £2bn for social housing. This comes on top of the February housing white paper, which promised reforms to boost the housing market and increase the supply of new homes, and the £2.3bn fund launched in July 2017 by the communities secretary, Sajid Javid, through the housing infrastructure fund, with the aim of opening bids for local authorities to come forward with proposals to aid faster building of homes.

But it is still not enough. The Chartered Institute of Housing’s annual review revealed that the government is spending four times less on building affordable homes for those on a low income than it is on subsidising private housing.

Building homes on Network Rail land, supporting urban community land trusts and beginning the foundations for a living rent has taught me that Britain must be far more pioneering. This crisis can only become more difficult to conquer the longer this task is left.
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.



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