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Please use this forum to discuss investment strategies and financial management. Do not use this forum to advertise or in any way promote personal interests. This site is not authorised to give financial advice and the views of the contributors in no way represent the views of this site. Anyone using this forum to make investment decisions does so at their own risk. Always perform your own research and seek independent advice.

Note that various articles on the housing markets of the UK, USA and Australia are recorded at House Price Crash Discussion Forums
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Slightly Optimistic
 27 Jan '18  13:05 : 0 recs

Without being bound by enforceable political rules, global finance doesn't discriminate - as long as it is safe and lucrative enough to risk investing. See Davos.
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Lord Byron
 27 Jan '18  11:49 : 0 recs

Who cares, i mean, they from sh#tholes.
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Slightly Optimistic
 26 Jan '18  10:10 : 0 recs : edited 1 time : last edit 26 Jan '18  10:33

International institutions/financial safeguards are powerless to deal with 'America first'. For example, Draghi opens fire at US dollar policy
Without explicitly mentioning him, Draghi took aim at the US Treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin, who said earlier this week that "obviously a weaker dollar is good for us [the US] as it relates to trade and opportunities."

Asked whether Mnuchin's comments were "helpful", Draghi read lines from a statement at a International Monetary Fund (IMF) meeting in October, where finance ministers and central bank governors said that: "We recognise that excessive volatility or disorderly movements in exchange rates can have adverse implications for economic and financial stability. We will refrain from competitive devaluations, and will not target our exchange rates for competitive purposes," the statement said. "I think that's my answer," Draghi told reporters.

He accused the US of "targeting" exchange rates to boost its economic interests, thus violating an agreement that "has been in place for decades".

From Quartz, a news agency: "Trump speaks at Davos. In a heavily anticipated speech today, the US president is expected to explain why his “America First” agenda is good for the world. A number of conference attendees plan to walk out during the address in protest of Trump calling African nations “sh*thole countries” earlier this month."
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Slightly Optimistic
 09 Jan '18  20:35 : 0 recs : edited 1 time : last edit 09 Jan '18  20:38

Important essay today by Dani Rodrik that attempts to excuse states from breaking the rules the US wrote to eliminate the financial instability that caused WW2.

In Defense of Economic Populism

Not all would agree with this advocacy of massive financial indiscipline within the global economy. For example when the Nixon shock was imposed on the world in 1971 to address US problems, Fed chair Arthur Burns described it as a tragedy for mankind. This set the scene for subsequent events including 2008.
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cynic 09
 23 Dec '17  16:24 : 0 recs

What can possibly go wrong?
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Slightly Optimistic
 21 Dec '17  15:53 : 0 recs : edited 1 time : last edit 21 Dec '17  15:55

A strength of the US economy is the petrodollar system that US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger obtained in tandem with the House of Saud back in 1974. Lots of effort has been spent trying to defend it.

Back in August, see Trade forum, some attention was paid to this huge advantage that SoS Kissinger helped to secure. What Would Happen If The Petrodollar System Ended Tomorrow

China has plans to remove this advantage, which are supported by the BRICS countries and countries suffering from US sanctions.

China plans to break petrodollar stranglehold
Petrodollars have dominated the global energy markets for more than 40 years. But now, China is looking to change that by replacing the word dollars for yuan.

The plan is to set up oil-futures trading in the yuan, which will be fully convertible into gold on the Shanghai and Hong Kong foreign exchange markets.

The era of the petroyuan will be at hand.
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little c
 15 Dec '17  13:34 : 0 recs

What distractions. precisely, little c to have, left?
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little c
 15 Dec '17  13:34 : 0 recs

What distractions. precisely, little c to have, left?
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little c
 15 Dec '17  13:34 : 0 recs

What distractions. precisely, little c to have, left?
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little c
 15 Dec '17  13:34 : 0 recs

What distractions. precisely, little c to have, left?
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little c
 15 Dec '17  13:34 : 0 recs

What distractions. precisely, little c to have, left?
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Slightly Optimistic
 15 Dec '17  13:22 : 0 recs

Distractions is all that little c has left.
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little c
 15 Dec '17  13:16 : 0 recs

What do you consider to be the great game? Afghanistan?
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little c
 15 Dec '17  13:16 : 0 recs

What do you consider to be the great game? Afghanistan?
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little c
 15 Dec '17  13:16 : 0 recs

What do you consider to be the great game? Afghanistan?
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Slightly Optimistic
 15 Dec '17  08:12 : 0 recs

Repeat:
[. . . All of this demonstrates the limits of Europe’s multilateralist aspirations. What Europe and Germany in particular would like the G20 to become appears to be merely a sideshow to the great game ]
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little c
 15 Dec '17  06:42 : 0 recs : edited 3 times : last edit 15 Dec '17  06:44

In reply, Slightly:

Finance and Investment
Please use this forum to discuss investment strategies and financial management. Do not use this forum to advertise or in any way promote personal interests. This site is not authorised to give financial advice and the views of the contributors in no way represent the views of this site. Anyone using this forum to make investment decisions does so at their own risk. Always perform your own research and seek independent advice.

Forum Post


Replying to Slightly Optimistic

After Germany's G20 this year, a German University felt obliged to write "The G20 summit was more successful than you think". The present unsatisfactory form of multilateralism in finance should continue, was essentially the conclusion of the 2017 Hamburg G20.

From August forums:
The Hamburg G20: A clash of competing visions of world affairs
Includes:
The two different approaches are global governance versus a concertation of power; in other words, multilateralism versus multipolarity. In the European understanding, the legitimacy of the G20 rests on its contribution to fostering global public goods. . .

. . . All of this demonstrates the limits of Europe’s multilateralist aspirations. What Europe and Germany in particular would like the G20 to become appears to be merely a sideshow to the great game

Brexit surely requires us to know the future of the EU.


The future, by definition, is essentially unknowable. Of course, one can assume that the future will go on very much as before, but things change, and often far more quickly than we think. Take global warming and climate change, for example! No more cold winters, like 1963's big freeze?
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Slightly Optimistic
 14 Dec '17  09:06 : 1 rec

After Germany's G20 this year, a German University felt obliged to write "The G20 summit was more successful than you think". The present unsatisfactory form of multilateralism in finance should continue, was essentially the conclusion of the 2017 Hamburg G20.

From August forums:
The Hamburg G20: A clash of competing visions of world affairs
Includes:
The two different approaches are global governance versus a concertation of power; in other words, multilateralism versus multipolarity. In the European understanding, the legitimacy of the G20 rests on its contribution to fostering global public goods. . .

. . . All of this demonstrates the limits of Europe’s multilateralist aspirations. What Europe and Germany in particular would like the G20 to become appears to be merely a sideshow to the great game

Brexit surely requires us to know the future of the EU.
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little c
 14 Dec '17  03:36 : 0 recs

There are one hundred trillion dollars at play every year, Slightly! Do you want a bigger slice of the action?
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little c
 13 Dec '17  14:00 : 0 recs

In reply:

Finance and Investment
Please use this forum to discuss investment strategies and financial management. Do not use this forum to advertise or in any way promote personal interests. This site is not authorised to give financial advice and the views of the contributors in no way represent the views of this site. Anyone using this forum to make investment decisions does so at their own risk. Always perform your own research and seek independent advice.

Forum Post


Replying to Slightly Optimistic

There's a much bigger picture in finance - see below..


Huge!
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