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The UK General Election



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little c
 10 Dec '17  11:53 : 0 recs

So are we actually going to leave?
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little c
 10 Dec '17  11:53 : 0 recs

So are we actually going to leave?
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George Sore Ass
 09 Dec '17  21:09 : 0 recs

So, it appears Theresa May got a deal!

Did anyone actually read it? The Daily Heil was high fiving that that UK is on its way. So clearly they didn't read it closely enough.

The text makes clear that the UK will leave the single market and customs union. However, it also makes clear that a hard border will be avoided in Ireland, and that unless the subsequent trade and other negotations can agree acceptable ways to avoid a hard border as part of a new trade deal, the UK will remain aligned with the rules of the customs union and single market.

So brexitters - better get working on those magic solutions, robot drones, ANPR, blockchain, mind control, etc. that will allow you to have no border between two different customs regimes (cluestick, it's not possible).

What the UK has signed up for is the right to pay the UK 45 billion quid and ongoing fees, to remain in the single market and customs union indefinitely, bound by all the rules, while having no MEPs and no representation where the rules are made.

Congratulations brexitters... you muppets!
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little c
 07 Dec '17  07:39 : 0 recs

Damian watches porn'?
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little c
 06 Dec '17  14:34 : 0 recs

If I may address your latest points directly, Gorgeous:

The UK General Election

Forum Post


Replying to George Sore Ass

Davis's evidence to the select committee today is absolutely astounding! For months Davis claimed, repeatedly, that the UK government was conducting extensive analysis of the impact of brexit on 50+ sectors of the economy. Full timeline and quotes from Davis himself here:

http://jackofkent.com/2017/11/the-early-history-of-the-58-brexit-sector-analyses/


“A variety of things. First, there is the sectoral analysis: they are working through about 50 cross-cutting sectors—what is going to happen to them, what the problems of those industrial groups are, and so on. That is both them and in liaison with other Departments. Some of them are setting up an engagement strategy.”

“…we are carrying out an extensive programme of sectoral analysis on the key factors that affect our negotiations with the European Union”.

“We are in the midst of carrying out about 57 sets of analyses, each of which has implications for individual parts of 85% of the economy. Some of those are still to be concluded.”


Now, he's just given evidence when questioned about why he's not releasing the 57 or 58 assessments as required by the recent vote:


Benn: So, just to be clear, has the government undertaken any impact assessments on the implications of leaving the EU for different sectors [of the economy]

Davis: Not in sectors. The Treasury, of course, has got an OBR forecast which has an implication, although even that is pretty crude ... There is no systematic impact assessment.

Benn: So the answer to the question is no. So the government hasn’t undertaken any impact assessments of implications of leaving the EU for different sectors of the British economy.

Davis: No.

Benn: So there isn’t one, for example, on the automobile sector?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of, no.

Benn: Is there one on aerospace?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of.

Benn: One on financial services?

Davis: I think the answer is going to be no to all of them.







Time to get Damian Green's computer technician to examine Mr Davis's computer. He's been doing something hours each day at his desk for the last 15 months or so in the job, but apparently not the job he was claiming.



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David Davis knows what he is doing. He used to be in the Special Air Squadron. Did you?
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little c
 06 Dec '17  14:34 : 0 recs

If I may address your latest points directly, Gorgeous:

The UK General Election

Forum Post


Replying to George Sore Ass

Davis's evidence to the select committee today is absolutely astounding! For months Davis claimed, repeatedly, that the UK government was conducting extensive analysis of the impact of brexit on 50+ sectors of the economy. Full timeline and quotes from Davis himself here:

http://jackofkent.com/2017/11/the-early-history-of-the-58-brexit-sector-analyses/


“A variety of things. First, there is the sectoral analysis: they are working through about 50 cross-cutting sectors—what is going to happen to them, what the problems of those industrial groups are, and so on. That is both them and in liaison with other Departments. Some of them are setting up an engagement strategy.”

“…we are carrying out an extensive programme of sectoral analysis on the key factors that affect our negotiations with the European Union”.

“We are in the midst of carrying out about 57 sets of analyses, each of which has implications for individual parts of 85% of the economy. Some of those are still to be concluded.”


Now, he's just given evidence when questioned about why he's not releasing the 57 or 58 assessments as required by the recent vote:


Benn: So, just to be clear, has the government undertaken any impact assessments on the implications of leaving the EU for different sectors [of the economy]

Davis: Not in sectors. The Treasury, of course, has got an OBR forecast which has an implication, although even that is pretty crude ... There is no systematic impact assessment.

Benn: So the answer to the question is no. So the government hasn’t undertaken any impact assessments of implications of leaving the EU for different sectors of the British economy.

Davis: No.

Benn: So there isn’t one, for example, on the automobile sector?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of, no.

Benn: Is there one on aerospace?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of.

Benn: One on financial services?

Davis: I think the answer is going to be no to all of them.







Time to get Damian Green's computer technician to examine Mr Davis's computer. He's been doing something hours each day at his desk for the last 15 months or so in the job, but apparently not the job he was claiming.



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David Davis knows what he is doing. He used to be in the Special Air Squadron. Did you?
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little c
 06 Dec '17  14:34 : 0 recs

If I may address your latest points directly, Gorgeous:

The UK General Election

Forum Post


Replying to George Sore Ass

Davis's evidence to the select committee today is absolutely astounding! For months Davis claimed, repeatedly, that the UK government was conducting extensive analysis of the impact of brexit on 50+ sectors of the economy. Full timeline and quotes from Davis himself here:

http://jackofkent.com/2017/11/the-early-history-of-the-58-brexit-sector-analyses/


“A variety of things. First, there is the sectoral analysis: they are working through about 50 cross-cutting sectors—what is going to happen to them, what the problems of those industrial groups are, and so on. That is both them and in liaison with other Departments. Some of them are setting up an engagement strategy.”

“…we are carrying out an extensive programme of sectoral analysis on the key factors that affect our negotiations with the European Union”.

“We are in the midst of carrying out about 57 sets of analyses, each of which has implications for individual parts of 85% of the economy. Some of those are still to be concluded.”


Now, he's just given evidence when questioned about why he's not releasing the 57 or 58 assessments as required by the recent vote:


Benn: So, just to be clear, has the government undertaken any impact assessments on the implications of leaving the EU for different sectors [of the economy]

Davis: Not in sectors. The Treasury, of course, has got an OBR forecast which has an implication, although even that is pretty crude ... There is no systematic impact assessment.

Benn: So the answer to the question is no. So the government hasn’t undertaken any impact assessments of implications of leaving the EU for different sectors of the British economy.

Davis: No.

Benn: So there isn’t one, for example, on the automobile sector?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of, no.

Benn: Is there one on aerospace?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of.

Benn: One on financial services?

Davis: I think the answer is going to be no to all of them.







Time to get Damian Green's computer technician to examine Mr Davis's computer. He's been doing something hours each day at his desk for the last 15 months or so in the job, but apparently not the job he was claiming.



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Important
Please refrain from posting anything that could be considered offensive.
Failing to do so may result in the termination of your account.
Note : You may edit your message within one hour of posting.


David Davis knows what he is doing. He used to be in the Special Air Squadron. Did you?
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little c
 06 Dec '17  14:34 : 0 recs

If I may address your latest points directly, Gorgeous:

The UK General Election

Forum Post


Replying to George Sore Ass

Davis's evidence to the select committee today is absolutely astounding! For months Davis claimed, repeatedly, that the UK government was conducting extensive analysis of the impact of brexit on 50+ sectors of the economy. Full timeline and quotes from Davis himself here:

http://jackofkent.com/2017/11/the-early-history-of-the-58-brexit-sector-analyses/


“A variety of things. First, there is the sectoral analysis: they are working through about 50 cross-cutting sectors—what is going to happen to them, what the problems of those industrial groups are, and so on. That is both them and in liaison with other Departments. Some of them are setting up an engagement strategy.”

“…we are carrying out an extensive programme of sectoral analysis on the key factors that affect our negotiations with the European Union”.

“We are in the midst of carrying out about 57 sets of analyses, each of which has implications for individual parts of 85% of the economy. Some of those are still to be concluded.”


Now, he's just given evidence when questioned about why he's not releasing the 57 or 58 assessments as required by the recent vote:


Benn: So, just to be clear, has the government undertaken any impact assessments on the implications of leaving the EU for different sectors [of the economy]

Davis: Not in sectors. The Treasury, of course, has got an OBR forecast which has an implication, although even that is pretty crude ... There is no systematic impact assessment.

Benn: So the answer to the question is no. So the government hasn’t undertaken any impact assessments of implications of leaving the EU for different sectors of the British economy.

Davis: No.

Benn: So there isn’t one, for example, on the automobile sector?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of, no.

Benn: Is there one on aerospace?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of.

Benn: One on financial services?

Davis: I think the answer is going to be no to all of them.







Time to get Damian Green's computer technician to examine Mr Davis's computer. He's been doing something hours each day at his desk for the last 15 months or so in the job, but apparently not the job he was claiming.



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Important
Please refrain from posting anything that could be considered offensive.
Failing to do so may result in the termination of your account.
Note : You may edit your message within one hour of posting.


David Davis knows what he is doing. He used to be in the Special Air Squadron. Did you?
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little c
 06 Dec '17  14:34 : 0 recs

If I may address your latest points directly, Gorgeous:

The UK General Election

Forum Post


Replying to George Sore Ass

Davis's evidence to the select committee today is absolutely astounding! For months Davis claimed, repeatedly, that the UK government was conducting extensive analysis of the impact of brexit on 50+ sectors of the economy. Full timeline and quotes from Davis himself here:

http://jackofkent.com/2017/11/the-early-history-of-the-58-brexit-sector-analyses/


“A variety of things. First, there is the sectoral analysis: they are working through about 50 cross-cutting sectors—what is going to happen to them, what the problems of those industrial groups are, and so on. That is both them and in liaison with other Departments. Some of them are setting up an engagement strategy.”

“…we are carrying out an extensive programme of sectoral analysis on the key factors that affect our negotiations with the European Union”.

“We are in the midst of carrying out about 57 sets of analyses, each of which has implications for individual parts of 85% of the economy. Some of those are still to be concluded.”


Now, he's just given evidence when questioned about why he's not releasing the 57 or 58 assessments as required by the recent vote:


Benn: So, just to be clear, has the government undertaken any impact assessments on the implications of leaving the EU for different sectors [of the economy]

Davis: Not in sectors. The Treasury, of course, has got an OBR forecast which has an implication, although even that is pretty crude ... There is no systematic impact assessment.

Benn: So the answer to the question is no. So the government hasn’t undertaken any impact assessments of implications of leaving the EU for different sectors of the British economy.

Davis: No.

Benn: So there isn’t one, for example, on the automobile sector?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of, no.

Benn: Is there one on aerospace?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of.

Benn: One on financial services?

Davis: I think the answer is going to be no to all of them.







Time to get Damian Green's computer technician to examine Mr Davis's computer. He's been doing something hours each day at his desk for the last 15 months or so in the job, but apparently not the job he was claiming.



Message Chrs. (0/10000)

Insert URL

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Centred Quote


Click to insert smiley :

Important
Please refrain from posting anything that could be considered offensive.
Failing to do so may result in the termination of your account.
Note : You may edit your message within one hour of posting.


David Davis knows what he is doing. He used to be in the Special Air Squadron. Did you?
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
George Sore Ass
 06 Dec '17  12:47 : 0 recs : edited 5 times : last edit 06 Dec '17  12:52

Davis's evidence to the select committee today is absolutely astounding! For months Davis claimed, repeatedly, that the UK government was conducting extensive analysis of the impact of brexit on 50+ sectors of the economy. Full timeline and quotes from Davis himself here:

http://jackofkent.com/2017/11/the-early-history-of-the-58-brexit-sector-analyses/


“A variety of things. First, there is the sectoral analysis: they are working through about 50 cross-cutting sectors—what is going to happen to them, what the problems of those industrial groups are, and so on. That is both them and in liaison with other Departments. Some of them are setting up an engagement strategy.”

“…we are carrying out an extensive programme of sectoral analysis on the key factors that affect our negotiations with the European Union”.

“We are in the midst of carrying out about 57 sets of analyses, each of which has implications for individual parts of 85% of the economy. Some of those are still to be concluded.”



Now, he's just given evidence when questioned about why he's not releasing the 57 or 58 assessments as required by the recent vote:


Benn: So, just to be clear, has the government undertaken any impact assessments on the implications of leaving the EU for different sectors [of the economy]

Davis: Not in sectors. The Treasury, of course, has got an OBR forecast which has an implication, although even that is pretty crude ... There is no systematic impact assessment.

Benn: So the answer to the question is no. So the government hasn’t undertaken any impact assessments of implications of leaving the EU for different sectors of the British economy.

Davis: No.

Benn: So there isn’t one, for example, on the automobile sector?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of, no.

Benn: Is there one on aerospace?

Davis: Not that I’m aware of.

Benn: One on financial services?

Davis: I think the answer is going to be no to all of them.








Time to get Damian Green's computer technician to examine Mr Davis's computer. He's been doing something hours each day at his desk for the last 15 months or so in the job, but apparently not the job he was claiming.
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
George Sore Ass
 06 Dec '17  12:19 : 0 recs

Ok, so David Davis's current brexit proposal:

1. Pay the EU 50 billion pounds

2. Keep within the EU, and subject to ECJ for 2 years after March 2019

3. Have 'regulatory alignment' with the EU to avoid a hard border in Ireland. While Davis tries to spin it that it will be mutual recognition, it's clear that the only way it will ever fly is to be essentially the UK following whatever the EU decides on regulations (which the UK will have no say in). Because there is no chance whatsoever that the EU is going to agree to letting the UK veto or formulate binding standards on it.

4. Continue to allow extensive immigration from the EU and elsewhere for sectors that require it, which seems to be everything from the NHS, to banking, to skilled professions to farm labourers.

The obvious question here, what exactly is the point now? You're leaving the EU, paying 50 billion for the privilege, then hiring thousands of civil servants and spending millions of man hours effectively recreated virtually the same structures and rules, while having to continue ongoing contributions to the EU, which will quite possibly be larger on a net basis than EU membership (because the UK had a rebate, and also got grants and funding back for many things).

The amazing thing is that brexitters are still convinced they're going to sign good trade deals with China, India, the USA, etc. Guys, look at what's happening with your EU negotiation... nobody owes you anything, whoever you negotiate with is going to push for the best possible deal they can get. Nobody will do you any favours. And you're getting your teeth kicked in by the EU, and accepting it, because you're small, weak and desperate. And after the EU screws you, you're going to still be small, weak and even more desperate. So don't expect the US, China or India to help you out. They'll approach things in exactly the same way, get the best deal for themselves.

The UK after brexit will be irrelevant and will be everyone's punchbag. Get used to the kicking the EU is giving you, because this is what every single negotiation afterwards for trade deals is going to be like, only your economy will be weaker, and your need to do a deal even more desperate.
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Thoughtful
 06 Dec '17  09:21 : 0 recs

A bit repetitive !
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little c
 05 Dec '17  19:03 : 0 recs

Good evening to you all! The Times leads today with some editorial comment on fudge pudding.

[quote]"Theresa May sat down to lunch with Jean-Claude Juncker yesterday hoping afterwards to announce a historic agreement between Britain and Europe to move on from talks about divorce to talks about the future. Something went badly awry before the coffee.mIn terms of choreography, a delicate diplomatic dance ground to a halt when a draft text of the agreement was leaked to Irish television. Headlines conjured visions of a post-Brexit Ireland in which Belfast was bound more tightly to Dublin than to London. Arlene Foster, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), stated immediately and unequivocally that this was a non-starter. In broader terms, Mrs May was ambushed by history. Last year’s referendum and this year’s election have left her in power but in a far weaker political position. The end is nigh … "

The Times thunders that Ulster Unionists have demonstrated their power to veto progress towards trade talks with Europe. Theresa May must find a way to get them back onside. If not, she will lose her premiership. Is a general election in the offing?
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
little c
 05 Dec '17  19:03 : 0 recs

Good evening to you all! The Times leads today with some editorial comment on fudge pudding.

[quote]"Theresa May sat down to lunch with Jean-Claude Juncker yesterday hoping afterwards to announce a historic agreement between Britain and Europe to move on from talks about divorce to talks about the future. Something went badly awry before the coffee.mIn terms of choreography, a delicate diplomatic dance ground to a halt when a draft text of the agreement was leaked to Irish television. Headlines conjured visions of a post-Brexit Ireland in which Belfast was bound more tightly to Dublin than to London. Arlene Foster, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), stated immediately and unequivocally that this was a non-starter. In broader terms, Mrs May was ambushed by history. Last year’s referendum and this year’s election have left her in power but in a far weaker political position. The end is nigh … "

The Times thunders that Ulster Unionists have demonstrated their power to veto progress towards trade talks with Europe. Theresa May must find a way to get them back onside. If not, she will lose her premiership. Is a general election in the offing?
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
little c
 05 Dec '17  19:03 : 0 recs

Good evening to you all! The Times leads today with some editorial comment on fudge pudding.

[quote]"Theresa May sat down to lunch with Jean-Claude Juncker yesterday hoping afterwards to announce a historic agreement between Britain and Europe to move on from talks about divorce to talks about the future. Something went badly awry before the coffee.mIn terms of choreography, a delicate diplomatic dance ground to a halt when a draft text of the agreement was leaked to Irish television. Headlines conjured visions of a post-Brexit Ireland in which Belfast was bound more tightly to Dublin than to London. Arlene Foster, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), stated immediately and unequivocally that this was a non-starter. In broader terms, Mrs May was ambushed by history. Last year’s referendum and this year’s election have left her in power but in a far weaker political position. The end is nigh … "

The Times thunders that Ulster Unionists have demonstrated their power to veto progress towards trade talks with Europe. Theresa May must find a way to get them back onside. If not, she will lose her premiership. Is a general election in the offing?
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
little c
 05 Dec '17  19:03 : 0 recs

Good evening to you all! The Times leads today with some editorial comment on fudge pudding.

[quote]"Theresa May sat down to lunch with Jean-Claude Juncker yesterday hoping afterwards to announce a historic agreement between Britain and Europe to move on from talks about divorce to talks about the future. Something went badly awry before the coffee.mIn terms of choreography, a delicate diplomatic dance ground to a halt when a draft text of the agreement was leaked to Irish television. Headlines conjured visions of a post-Brexit Ireland in which Belfast was bound more tightly to Dublin than to London. Arlene Foster, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), stated immediately and unequivocally that this was a non-starter. In broader terms, Mrs May was ambushed by history. Last year’s referendum and this year’s election have left her in power but in a far weaker political position. The end is nigh … "

The Times thunders that Ulster Unionists have demonstrated their power to veto progress towards trade talks with Europe. Theresa May must find a way to get them back onside. If not, she will lose her premiership. Is a general election in the offing?
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
little c
 05 Dec '17  19:03 : 0 recs

Good evening to you all! The Times leads today with some editorial comment on fudge pudding.

[quote]"Theresa May sat down to lunch with Jean-Claude Juncker yesterday hoping afterwards to announce a historic agreement between Britain and Europe to move on from talks about divorce to talks about the future. Something went badly awry before the coffee.mIn terms of choreography, a delicate diplomatic dance ground to a halt when a draft text of the agreement was leaked to Irish television. Headlines conjured visions of a post-Brexit Ireland in which Belfast was bound more tightly to Dublin than to London. Arlene Foster, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), stated immediately and unequivocally that this was a non-starter. In broader terms, Mrs May was ambushed by history. Last year’s referendum and this year’s election have left her in power but in a far weaker political position. The end is nigh … "

The Times thunders that Ulster Unionists have demonstrated their power to veto progress towards trade talks with Europe. Theresa May must find a way to get them back onside. If not, she will lose her premiership. Is a general election in the offing?
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
little c
 05 Dec '17  19:03 : 0 recs

Good evening to you all! The Times leads today with some editorial comment on fudge pudding.

[quote]"Theresa May sat down to lunch with Jean-Claude Juncker yesterday hoping afterwards to announce a historic agreement between Britain and Europe to move on from talks about divorce to talks about the future. Something went badly awry before the coffee.mIn terms of choreography, a delicate diplomatic dance ground to a halt when a draft text of the agreement was leaked to Irish television. Headlines conjured visions of a post-Brexit Ireland in which Belfast was bound more tightly to Dublin than to London. Arlene Foster, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), stated immediately and unequivocally that this was a non-starter. In broader terms, Mrs May was ambushed by history. Last year’s referendum and this year’s election have left her in power but in a far weaker political position. The end is nigh … "

The Times thunders that Ulster Unionists have demonstrated their power to veto progress towards trade talks with Europe. Theresa May must find a way to get them back onside. If not, she will lose her premiership. Is a general election in the offing?
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
little c
 05 Dec '17  19:03 : 0 recs

Good evening to you all! The Times leads today with some editorial comment on fudge pudding.

[quote]"Theresa May sat down to lunch with Jean-Claude Juncker yesterday hoping afterwards to announce a historic agreement between Britain and Europe to move on from talks about divorce to talks about the future. Something went badly awry before the coffee.mIn terms of choreography, a delicate diplomatic dance ground to a halt when a draft text of the agreement was leaked to Irish television. Headlines conjured visions of a post-Brexit Ireland in which Belfast was bound more tightly to Dublin than to London. Arlene Foster, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), stated immediately and unequivocally that this was a non-starter. In broader terms, Mrs May was ambushed by history. Last year’s referendum and this year’s election have left her in power but in a far weaker political position. The end is nigh … "

The Times thunders that Ulster Unionists have demonstrated their power to veto progress towards trade talks with Europe. Theresa May must find a way to get them back onside. If not, she will lose her premiership. Is a general election in the offing?
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.
little c
 05 Dec '17  19:03 : 0 recs

Good evening to you all! The Times leads today with some editorial comment on fudge pudding.

[quote]"Theresa May sat down to lunch with Jean-Claude Juncker yesterday hoping afterwards to announce a historic agreement between Britain and Europe to move on from talks about divorce to talks about the future. Something went badly awry before the coffee.mIn terms of choreography, a delicate diplomatic dance ground to a halt when a draft text of the agreement was leaked to Irish television. Headlines conjured visions of a post-Brexit Ireland in which Belfast was bound more tightly to Dublin than to London. Arlene Foster, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), stated immediately and unequivocally that this was a non-starter. In broader terms, Mrs May was ambushed by history. Last year’s referendum and this year’s election have left her in power but in a far weaker political position. The end is nigh … "

The Times thunders that Ulster Unionists have demonstrated their power to veto progress towards trade talks with Europe. Theresa May must find a way to get them back onside. If not, she will lose her premiership. Is a general election in the offing?
 You must either register or login to post to Serious Topics.



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