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UsernameSlightly Optimistic
Joined04 Feb '06  18:48
First Post04 Feb '06  20:22
Last Post02 May '16  05:43
Total Posts8889
Total Recommendations668

Last 10 posts


02 May '16  05:43
Finance and Investment
The importance of 'gunboats' in international law and norms.
01 May '16  13:15
Finance and Investment
On the subject of sovereign debt and the global economy:

The US's liberal international order and Puerto Rico
the impasse on Capitol Hill has come down to one politically loaded word — “bailout.”

01 May '16  11:48
Finance and Investment
Interesting piece today on sovereign debt - the treatment of which is crucial to the EU and the global economy.

Europe's liberal illusions shatter as Greek tragedy plays on
01 May '16  09:25
Finance and Investment
Repeat:

The US's liberal international order?

The US National Interest
CHINA’S RAPID ascent to great-power status has, more than any other international development, raised concerns about the future of the liberal international order.

The presidential candidates [.] face questions of international order that are more fundamental than any since the end of the Cold War. . . The candidates and their advisors will need to offer strategies to bolster world order, to reshape it where necessary and to ensure that it has a fighting chance of living on for at least another seven decades.

the task of the United States and its partners is to bring China into the existing order, and that if the attempt proves unsuccessful, the seventy-year-old, rules-based global order is headed for the dustbin of history.

Effective and enduring U.S. global leadership requires that policymakers accept a new normal in the relationship with China. . . This attempt, and the imperative of working with traditional friends to shape Beijing’s choices, starts with an appreciation for the realities of global order today, and of China’s multifaceted approach to it.


And then there are G20 worries such as unilateralism, economic growth, debt, financial stability and sovereignty. In a multipolar world the EU might be able to help.
01 May '16  08:39
Finance and Investment
Many governments doesn't think so. See NATO defence spending below.

It is surprising that Belgium still hosts the security alliance despite spending only a fraction of the international requirement.
01 May '16  07:09
Finance and Investment
Implications for NATO, for example, of such a policy change?
30 Apr '16  19:34
Finance and Investment
The US's liberal international order?

The US National Interest
CHINA’S RAPID ascent to great-power status has, more than any other international development, raised concerns about the future of the liberal international order.

The presidential candidates [.] face questions of international order that are more fundamental than any since the end of the Cold War. . . The candidates and their advisors will need to offer strategies to bolster world order, to reshape it where necessary and to ensure that it has a fighting chance of living on for at least another seven decades.

the task of the United States and its partners is to bring China into the existing order, and that if the attempt proves unsuccessful, the seventy-year-old, rules-based global order is headed for the dustbin of history.

Effective and enduring U.S. global leadership requires that policymakers accept a new normal in the relationship with China. . . This attempt, and the imperative of working with traditional friends to shape Beijing’s choices, starts with an appreciation for the realities of global order today, and of China’s multifaceted approach to it.

And then there are G20 worries such as unilateralism, economic growth, debt, financial stability and sovereignty. In a multipolar world the EU might be able to help.
29 Apr '16  17:28
Finance and Investment
The US's "liberal international order"?

The essay in 'Foreign Affairs' gives us reasons why the White House doubts that the UK would uphold the US's transient financial "order". Mentioned were joining the AIIB against President Obama's wishes, the UK's "constant accommodation" of China, and PM Cameron promising to act as China's "strongest advocate in the west".

It is recommended elsewhere that the US must reform the IMF if that cross-border organisation is to continue. This will require the US to sell its "liberal international order" multilaterally. What changes are likely?
29 Apr '16  11:57
Finance and Investment
Different priorities

The US administration has downgraded its friendship with the UK from 'special relationship' to a 'special partnership', we read in an essay in a US 'Foreign Affairs', a few days ago. Moreover the US President suggested he is prioritising transatlantic relations less than his predecessors - he promised to be "America's first Pacific president". The US shift to Asia is likely to be permanent.

The article ends by telling us there is now a multipolar reality. It seems that the US considers the EU to be one of the poles, not the UK - which could be "no longer be counted on to uphold the liberal international order."

Implications for NATO?
29 Apr '16  07:55
Finance and Investment
NATO Defence Spending: % of GDP in 2015

US 3.6%; Greece 2.4%; Poland 2.2%; UK 2.1%; Estonia 2%; France 1.8%; Turkey 1.7%; Norway 1.5%; Croatia 1.4%; Portugal 1.4%; Romania 1.4%; Albania 1.2%; Bulgaria 1.2%; Denmark 1.2%; Germany 1.2%; Netherlands 1.3%; Lithuania 1.1%; Czech Republic 1%; Italy 1%; Latvia 1%; Slovak Republic 1%; Slovenia 1%; Canada 1%; Belgium 0.9%; Hungary 0.9%; Spain 0.9%; Luxembourg 0.5%.

Different priorities.


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